Beverage Manufacturers: The Big Fat Lie

Beverage Manufacturers: The Big Fat Lie

Should soda manufacturers tell you how bad soda is?

A recent article in the New York Times debated whether or not manufacturers should be responsible for telling people how bad sodas, juices, and other sugary drinks are for them. The editorial brought up some good points, mostly that it’s incredibly difficult to glean nutrition information by looking at a soda can – and the beverage manufacturers want it to stay that way. If you ask the coaches at BodyTech, they can easily tell you just how bad ALL sodas are for the body because they see it’s ill effects walk through the doors every day.

 

NO NEW NEWS: Drinks and foods with excessive amounts of sugar are incredibly unhealthy for your body.

We already know that sodas are some of the worst drinks we can put into our bodies. Not only is sugar four times more addictive than cocaine, but there are links between sodas and obesity, diabetes, depression, inflammation and a host of other health problems. What you may not realize, however, is that soda is not the only sugary drink to avoid. Many of your favorite beverages may be on the “naughty” dieter list!

Some drinks with a surprising amount of sugar include:

  • Gatorade
  • Snapple (and other bottled tea)
  • Vitamin Water
  • Capri Sun
  • Fruit Juices

A far cry from healthy—regardless of what the label might lead you to believe.

 

These drinks can appear to be healthy when in reality they are not.

Different countries around the world have responded to sugary drinks and their role in the growing global obesity epidemic in a variety of ways. In Great Britain, a soda tax is set to be instated in a few years. Mexico passed such a tax back in 2013 (and it’s working!). And taxes aren’t the only means being used to strike back. Ecuador requires food manufacturers to add traffic light labels to food packaging indicating the relative healthfulness, a method which tends to be much easier to understand compared to numeric nutrition facts (as it turns out, studies have shown that numeric labels do no better than unlabeled bottles at helping people understand the health effects of their food choices).

 

Manufacturers have their spin down and are pushing back against possible changes in labeling.

Opposition to changing food and drink labels runs deep, especially when you’re up against such a massive industry. When the author of that New York Times editorial asked for a statement from the American Beverage Association, they responded by saying “Consumers want factual information to help make informed choices that are right for them, and America’s beverage companies already provide clear calorie labels on the front of our products. A warning label that suggests beverages are a unique driver of complex conditions such as diabetes and obesity is inaccurate and misleading.” In short, they are suggesting that labels already provide all the information people need to make the right choices – even though we know this isn’t always true.

 

What do you think?

Do you wish it were easier to understand what beverages are good for you and what are bad for you? Has limiting your consumption of sugary beverages had a positive impact on your life? Email us ideal@mybodytech.com, we want to hear from you!

If you’re ready to kick soda out of your life for good, and you need a dose of clarity to understand all the confusing information about you, come to a free info session with BodyTech! We’re here to help you develop good habits and keep them up for life.

Get the full scoop on sugar in the beverages you drink. Signup for a FREE introductory seminar. Click here.

 

 

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Beverage Manufacturers: The Big Fat Lie


Beverage Manufacturers: The Big Fat Lie

Should soda manufacturers tell you how bad soda is?

A recent article in the New York Times debated whether or not manufacturers should be responsible for telling people how bad sodas, juices, and other sugary drinks are for them. The editorial brought up some good points, mostly that it’s incredibly difficult to glean nutrition information by looking at a soda can – and the beverage manufacturers want it to stay that way. If you ask the coaches at BodyTech, they can easily tell you just how bad ALL sodas are for the body because they see it’s ill effects walk through the doors every day.

 

NO NEW NEWS: Drinks and foods with excessive amounts of sugar are incredibly unhealthy for your body.

We already know that sodas are some of the worst drinks we can put into our bodies. Not only is sugar four times more addictive than cocaine, but there are links between sodas and obesity, diabetes, depression, inflammation and a host of other health problems. What you may not realize, however, is that soda is not the only sugary drink to avoid. Many of your favorite beverages may be on the “naughty” dieter list!

Some drinks with a surprising amount of sugar include:

A far cry from healthy—regardless of what the label might lead you to believe.

 

These drinks can appear to be healthy when in reality they are not.

Different countries around the world have responded to sugary drinks and their role in the growing global obesity epidemic in a variety of ways. In Great Britain, a soda tax is set to be instated in a few years. Mexico passed such a tax back in 2013 (and it’s working!). And taxes aren’t the only means being used to strike back. Ecuador requires food manufacturers to add traffic light labels to food packaging indicating the relative healthfulness, a method which tends to be much easier to understand compared to numeric nutrition facts (as it turns out, studies have shown that numeric labels do no better than unlabeled bottles at helping people understand the health effects of their food choices).

 

Manufacturers have their spin down and are pushing back against possible changes in labeling.

Opposition to changing food and drink labels runs deep, especially when you’re up against such a massive industry. When the author of that New York Times editorial asked for a statement from the American Beverage Association, they responded by saying “Consumers want factual information to help make informed choices that are right for them, and America’s beverage companies already provide clear calorie labels on the front of our products. A warning label that suggests beverages are a unique driver of complex conditions such as diabetes and obesity is inaccurate and misleading.” In short, they are suggesting that labels already provide all the information people need to make the right choices – even though we know this isn’t always true.

 

What do you think?

Do you wish it were easier to understand what beverages are good for you and what are bad for you? Has limiting your consumption of sugary beverages had a positive impact on your life? Email us ideal@mybodytech.com, we want to hear from you!

If you’re ready to kick soda out of your life for good, and you need a dose of clarity to understand all the confusing information about you, come to a free info session with BodyTech! We’re here to help you develop good habits and keep them up for life.

Get the full scoop on sugar in the beverages you drink. Signup for a FREE introductory seminar. Click here.